About Me


Wolf Ademeit, born 1954, lives in Duisburg, Germany. The author prefers calling himself a hobbyist, though his professional life has been always closely connected with this field – he owns an advertising agency and a photo studio. Wolf Ademeit first took interest in photography when studying lithographer's craft and it's been his passion since, for more than 30 years now.

It's Ademeit's distinctive approach that makes his works stand out of a long row of ever trendy black and white photography adepts or, speaking of his most known series, animalist masters. Unique of the author is his 'hobbyist' choice to capture expressive portraits of zoo animals. Rather than focusing on wildlife in their naturally beautiful habitats, Ademeit finds charm and personality in the facial expressions of his subjects alone. Call it 'animal portraits', if you wish. More than simply keeping a visual record, the photographer provides an artistic portrayal that is often reserved for human portraiture.

Says the author: "Only a few photographers use the photography of animals in zoos as an art form. I think this is a missed opportunity… With my pictures I would like to move the photography of these animals in the focus of the art photography and show photos which are not only purely documentary."

Ademeit's incredibly artistic collection of images offers a wide range of emotions, capturing every grimace, ferocious roar, tender kiss, and twinkle in the varied creatures' eyes, each caught within a second of the animal's position he sought for. No wonder his highly acclaimed Animals series took 5 years to finish, patience being a part of the author's talent and mastership.

-Vadim Yatsenko
Bruice Collections, Kiew

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Reptiles

  • 090401-11289-speed   Wolf Ademeit
  • 080210-04746-snake_2   Wolf Ademeit
  • 081116-00206-thooth_gap   Wolf Ademeit
  • 100927-00146-snake   Wolf Ademeit
  • 070607-00862-turtle   Wolf Ademeit
  • 081116-00237-snap_shot   Wolf Ademeit
  • 090401-00005-giant_tortoise   Wolf Ademeit
  • 080830-00134-nice_try   Wolf Ademeit
  • 090401-11242-turtle   Wolf Ademeit

About Reptiles


Reptiles are among the oldest land creatures...

Reptiles are tetrapod animals in the class Reptilia, comprising today's turtles, crocodilians, snakes, amphisbaenians, lizards, tuatara, and their extinct relativesThe study of these traditional reptile orders, historically combined with that of modern amphibians, is called herpetology.

Because some reptiles are more closely related to birds than they are to other reptiles (e.g., crocodiles are more closely related to birds than they are to lizards), the traditional groups of "reptiles" listed above do not together constitute a monophyletic grouping or clade (consisting of all descendants of a common ancestor). For this reason, many modern scientists prefer to consider the birds part of Reptilia as well, thereby making Reptilia a monophyletic class, including all living Diapsids.

The earliest known proto-reptiles originated around 312 million years ago during the Carboniferous period, having evolved from advanced reptiliomorph tetrapods that became increasingly adapted to life on dry land. Some early examples include the lizard-like Hylonomus and Casineria. In addition to the living reptiles, there are many diverse groups that are now extinct, in some cases due to mass extinction events. In particular, the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event wiped out the pterosaurs, plesiosaurs, ornithischians, and sauropods, as well as many species of theropods, including troodontids, dromaeosaurids, tyrannosaurids, and abelisaurids, along with many Crocodyliformes, and squamates (e.g. mosasaurids).

Modern non-avian reptiles inhabit all the continents except Antarctica, although some birds are found on the periphery of Antarctica. Several living subgroups are recognized: Testudines (turtles and tortoises), 350 species; Rhynchocephalia (tuatara from New Zealand), 1 species;[5][6] Squamata (lizards, snakes, and worm lizards), over 10,200 species; Crocodilia (crocodiles, gavials, caimans, and alligators), 24 species; and Aves (birds), approximately 10,000 species.

Reptiles are tetrapod vertebrates, creatures that either have four limbs or, like snakes, are descended from four-limbed ancestors. Unlike amphibians, reptiles do not have an aquatic larval stage. Most reptiles are oviparous, although several species of squamates are viviparous, as were some extinct aquatic clades[ – the fetus develops within the mother, contained in a placenta rather than an eggshell. As amniotes, reptile eggs are surrounded by membranes for protection and transport, which adapt them to reproduction on dry land. Many of the viviparous species feed their fetuses through various forms of placenta analogous to those of mammals, with some providing initial care for their hatchlings. Extant reptiles range in size from a tiny gecko, Sphaerodactylus ariasae, which can grow up to 17 mm (0.7 in) to the saltwater crocodile, Crocodylus porosus, which can reach 6 m (19.7 ft) in length and weigh over 1,000 kg (2,200 lb).

Source: Wikipedia

Enjoy Reptiles

  • 100927-00146-snake   Wolf Ademeit

    100927-00146-snake Wolf Ademeit

  • 090401-11289-speed   Wolf Ademeit

    090401-11289-speed Wolf Ademeit

  • 090401-11242-turtle   Wolf Ademeit

    090401-11242-turtle Wolf Ademeit

  • 090401-00005-giant_tortoise   Wolf Ademeit

    090401-00005-giant_tortoise Wolf Ademeit

  • 081116-00237-snap_shot   Wolf Ademeit

    081116-00237-snap_shot Wolf Ademeit

  • 081116-00206-thooth_gap   Wolf Ademeit

    081116-00206-thooth_gap Wolf Ademeit

  • 080830-00134-nice_try   Wolf Ademeit

    080830-00134-nice_try Wolf Ademeit

  • 080210-04746-snake_2   Wolf Ademeit

    080210-04746-snake_2 Wolf Ademeit

  • 070607-00862-turtle   Wolf Ademeit

    070607-00862-turtle Wolf Ademeit