About Me


Wolf Ademeit, born 1954, lives in Duisburg, Germany. The author prefers calling himself a hobbyist, though his professional life has been always closely connected with this field – he owns an advertising agency and a photo studio. Wolf Ademeit first took interest in photography when studying lithographer's craft and it's been his passion since, for more than 30 years now.

It's Ademeit's distinctive approach that makes his works stand out of a long row of ever trendy black and white photography adepts or, speaking of his most known series, animalist masters. Unique of the author is his 'hobbyist' choice to capture expressive portraits of zoo animals. Rather than focusing on wildlife in their naturally beautiful habitats, Ademeit finds charm and personality in the facial expressions of his subjects alone. Call it 'animal portraits', if you wish. More than simply keeping a visual record, the photographer provides an artistic portrayal that is often reserved for human portraiture.

Says the author: "Only a few photographers use the photography of animals in zoos as an art form. I think this is a missed opportunity… With my pictures I would like to move the photography of these animals in the focus of the art photography and show photos which are not only purely documentary."

Ademeit's incredibly artistic collection of images offers a wide range of emotions, capturing every grimace, ferocious roar, tender kiss, and twinkle in the varied creatures' eyes, each caught within a second of the animal's position he sought for. No wonder his highly acclaimed Animals series took 5 years to finish, patience being a part of the author's talent and mastership.

-Vadim Yatsenko
Bruice Collections, Kiew

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Mandrills

  • 110903-00036-mandrill   Wolf Ademeit
  • 120721-00822-mandrill_portrait   Wolf Ademeit
  • 130824-00553-hi_human   Wolf Ademeit
  • 120721-00733-mandrill_portrait   Wolf Ademeit
  • 150822-00581-armend_to_fight   Wolf Ademeit
  • 090131-00287-the_mask   Wolf Ademeit

About Mandrills


Impressive primates that immediately captivate you...

The mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) is a primate of the Old World monkey (Cercopithecidae) family

It is one of two species assigned to the genus Mandrillus, along with the drill. Both the mandrill and the drill were once classified as baboons in the genus Papio, but they now have their own genus, Mandrillus. Although they look superficially like baboons, they are more closely related to Cercocebus mangabeys. Mandrills are found in southern Cameroon, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, and Congo. Mandrills mostly live in tropical rainforests. They live in very large groups. Mandrills have an omnivorous diet consisting mostly of fruits and insects. Their mating season peaks in July to September, with a corresponding birth peak in December to April.

Mandrills are the world's largest monkeys. The mandrill is classified as vulnerable by IUCN.

The mandrill has an olive green or dark grey pelage with yellow and black bands and a white belly. Its hairless face has an elongated muzzle with distinctive characteristics, such as a red stripe down the middle and protruding blue ridges on the sides. It also has red nostrils and lips, a yellow beard and white tufts. The areas around the genitals and the anus are multi-colored, being red, pink, blue, scarlet, and purple. They also have pale pink ischial callosities. The coloration of the animal is more pronounced in dominant adult males. Both sexes have chest glands, which are used in olfactory communication. These, too, are more prominent in dominant adult males. Males also have longer canines than females, which can be up to 6.35 cm (2.50 in) and 1.0 cm, respectively.

The mandrill is one of the most sexually dimorphic mammals due to extremely strong sexual selection which favors males in both size and coloration. Males typically weigh 19–37 kg (42–82 lb), with an average mass of 32.3 kg (71 lb). Females weigh roughly half as much as the male, at 10–15 kg (22–33 lb) and an average of 12.4 kg (27 lb). Exceptionally large males can weigh up to 54 kg (119 lb), with unconfirmed reports of outsized mandrills weighing 60 kg (130 lb) per the Guinness Book of World Records. The mandrill is the heaviest living monkey, somewhat surpassing even the largest baboons such as chacma baboon and olive baboons in average weight even considering its more extreme sexual dimorphism, but the mandrill averages both shorter in the length and height at the shoulder than these species. The average male is 75–95 cm (30–37 in) long and the female is 55–66 cm (22–26 in), with the short tail adding another 5–10 cm (2–4 in). The shoulder height while on all fours can range from 45–50 cm (18–20 in) in females and 55–65 cm (22–26 in) in males. Compared to the largest baboons, the mandrill is more ape-like in structure, with a muscular and compact build, shorter, thicker limbs that are longer in the front and almost no tail. Mandrills can live up to 31 years in captivity. Females reach sexual maturity at about 3.5 years.

Source: Wikipedia

Enjoy Mandrills

  • 120721-00822-mandrill_portrait   Wolf Ademeit

    120721-00822-mandrill_portrait Wolf Ademeit

  • 150822-00581-armend_to_fight   Wolf Ademeit

    150822-00581-armend_to_fight Wolf Ademeit

  • 130824-00553-hi_human   Wolf Ademeit

    130824-00553-hi_human Wolf Ademeit

  • 120721-00733-mandrill_portrait   Wolf Ademeit

    120721-00733-mandrill_portrait Wolf Ademeit

  • 110903-00036-mandrill   Wolf Ademeit

    110903-00036-mandrill Wolf Ademeit

  • 090131-00287-the_mask   Wolf Ademeit

    090131-00287-the_mask Wolf Ademeit