About Me


Wolf Ademeit, born 1954, lives in Duisburg, Germany. The author prefers calling himself a hobbyist, though his professional life has been always closely connected with this field – he owns an advertising agency and a photo studio. Wolf Ademeit first took interest in photography when studying lithographer's craft and it's been his passion since, for more than 30 years now.

It's Ademeit's distinctive approach that makes his works stand out of a long row of ever trendy black and white photography adepts or, speaking of his most known series, animalist masters. Unique of the author is his 'hobbyist' choice to capture expressive portraits of zoo animals. Rather than focusing on wildlife in their naturally beautiful habitats, Ademeit finds charm and personality in the facial expressions of his subjects alone. Call it 'animal portraits', if you wish. More than simply keeping a visual record, the photographer provides an artistic portrayal that is often reserved for human portraiture.

Says the author: "Only a few photographers use the photography of animals in zoos as an art form. I think this is a missed opportunity… With my pictures I would like to move the photography of these animals in the focus of the art photography and show photos which are not only purely documentary."

Ademeit's incredibly artistic collection of images offers a wide range of emotions, capturing every grimace, ferocious roar, tender kiss, and twinkle in the varied creatures' eyes, each caught within a second of the animal's position he sought for. No wonder his highly acclaimed Animals series took 5 years to finish, patience being a part of the author's talent and mastership.

-Vadim Yatsenko
Bruice Collections, Kiew

Type your Name here

This field is required

Type your eMail here

This field is required

Type your input data here

This field is required

Kudus

  • 150508-00267-kudu_head   Wolf Ademeit
  • 170901-00703-male_kudu   Wolf Ademeit
  • 140329-00088-young_kudu
  • 080914-01225-kudu_1   Wolf Ademeit
  • 170904-00117-big_kudu   Wolf Ademeit
  • 170901-00195-licking_kudu   Wolf Ademeit
  • 081018-00092-kudu_portrait_2   Wolf Ademeit
  • 080830-00058-young_kudu   Wolf Ademeit
  • 110813-01128-kudu_head_up   Wolf Ademeit
  • 150822-00107-shadow_fighter   Wolf Ademeit
  • 120414-00400-majestically_kudu   Wolf Ademeit
  • 150412-00113-the_kudu   Wolf Ademeit
  • 081102-00627-autumn   Wolf Ademeit
  • 130824-00009-backlight   Wolf Ademeit
  • 150508-00261-proud_kudu   Wolf Ademeit
  • 161012-00892-kudus   Wolf Ademeit
  • 081102-00632-head_stand   Wolf Ademeit
  • 150904-00329-kudu_profile   Wolf Ademeit
  • 090320-09169-head_up_2   Wolf Ademeit
  • 081102-00641-kudu_head_up   Wolf Ademeit
  • 090320-09168-head_up_1   Wolf Ademeit
  • 090830-00035-nyala_3   Wolf Ademeit
  • 110723-00102-kudu_love   Wolf Ademeit
  • 150508-00257-up   Wolf Ademeit

About Kudus


A beautiful animal with imposing horns...

The kudus are two species of antelope of the genus Tragelaphus

The name of the animal was imported into English in the 18th century from isiXhosa iqhude, via Afrikaans koedoe part zebra part deer. Kudu, or koodoo, is the Khoikhoi name for this antelope. Tragos (Greek) denotes a he-goat and elaphos (Greek) a deer. Strepho (Greek) means "I twist", and strephis is "twisting". Keras (Greek) refers to the horn of the animal.

Lesser kudus come from the savanna near Acacia and Commiphora shrubs. They have to rely on thickets for protection, so they are rarely seen in the open. Their brown and striped pelts help to camouflage them in scrub environments.

Like many other antelope, male kudus can be found in bachelor groups, but they are more likely to be solitary. Their dominance displays tend not to last long and are generally fairly peaceful, consisting of one male making himself look big by making his hair stand on end. When males do have a face-off, they will lock their horns in a competition to determine the stronger puller; kudus' necks enlarge during the mating season for this reason. Sometimes two competing males are unable to unlock their horns and, if unable to disengage, will die of starvation or dehydration. Males are seen with females only in the mating season, when they join in groups of 5–15 kudus, including offspring. Calves grow very quickly and at six months are fairly independent of their mothers.

A pregnant female will leave the herd to give birth to a single offspring. She will leave the newborn lying hidden for 4–5 weeks while coming back only to nurse it, which is the longest amount of time for any antelope species. Then the calf will start meeting its mother for short periods. At 3 or 4 months, the calf will be with its mother constantly, and at about six months they will permanently join the group.

When threatened, the kudu will often run away rather than fight. Wounded bulls have been known to charge the attacker, hitting the attacker with their sturdy horn base rather than stabbing it. Wounded females can keep running for many miles without stopping to rest for more than a minute. They are great kickers and are capable of breaking a wild dog's or jackal's neck or back. They are good jumpers and can clear a 5-foot fence from a standing start.

Source: Wikipedia

Enjoy Kudus

  • 161012-00892-kudus   Wolf Ademeit

    161012-00892-kudus Wolf Ademeit

  • 170904-00117-big_kudu   Wolf Ademeit

    170904-00117-big_kudu Wolf Ademeit

  • 170901-00703-male_kudu   Wolf Ademeit

    170901-00703-male_kudu Wolf Ademeit

  • 170901-00195-licking_kudu   Wolf Ademeit

    170901-00195-licking_kudu Wolf Ademeit

  • 150904-00329-kudu_profile   Wolf Ademeit

    150904-00329-kudu_profile Wolf Ademeit

  • 150822-00107-shadow_fighter   Wolf Ademeit

    150822-00107-shadow_fighter Wolf Ademeit

  • 150508-00267-kudu_head   Wolf Ademeit

    150508-00267-kudu_head Wolf Ademeit

  • 150508-00261-proud_kudu   Wolf Ademeit

    150508-00261-proud_kudu Wolf Ademeit

  • 150508-00257-up   Wolf Ademeit

    150508-00257-up Wolf Ademeit

  • 150412-00113-the_kudu   Wolf Ademeit

    150412-00113-the_kudu Wolf Ademeit

  • 140329-00088-young_kudu

    140329-00088-young_kudu

  • 130824-00009-backlight   Wolf Ademeit

    130824-00009-backlight Wolf Ademeit

  • 120414-00400-majestically_kudu   Wolf Ademeit

    120414-00400-majestically_kudu Wolf Ademeit

  • 110813-01128-kudu_head_up   Wolf Ademeit

    110813-01128-kudu_head_up Wolf Ademeit

  • 110723-00102-kudu_love   Wolf Ademeit

    110723-00102-kudu_love Wolf Ademeit

  • 090830-00035-nyala_3   Wolf Ademeit

    090830-00035-nyala_3 Wolf Ademeit

  • 090320-09169-head_up_2   Wolf Ademeit

    090320-09169-head_up_2 Wolf Ademeit

  • 090320-09168-head_up_1   Wolf Ademeit

    090320-09168-head_up_1 Wolf Ademeit

  • 081102-00641-kudu_head_up   Wolf Ademeit

    081102-00641-kudu_head_up Wolf Ademeit

  • 081102-00632-head_stand   Wolf Ademeit

    081102-00632-head_stand Wolf Ademeit

  • 081102-00627-autumn   Wolf Ademeit

    081102-00627-autumn Wolf Ademeit

  • 081018-00092-kudu_portrait_2   Wolf Ademeit

    081018-00092-kudu_portrait_2 Wolf Ademeit

  • 080914-01225-kudu_1   Wolf Ademeit

    080914-01225-kudu_1 Wolf Ademeit

  • 080830-00058-young_kudu   Wolf Ademeit

    080830-00058-young_kudu Wolf Ademeit